Browsing Tag

space travel

The Science of Ad Astra

In this special episode we hurtle into deep space to explore the new Brad Pitt movie AD ASTRA.

Apocalypse Now in space.

Our intrepid hosts attempt to answer the questions of our special guests; 12 year old Eddie and 15 year old Oliver.


Dig our state of the art recording facility

Like is it possible for there to be a car chase…sorry…a badass lunar rover chase(!) on the moon?



And what happens to your body and your mind when you’re in deep space for 30 years? (Hint-it’s not great)

I’m sure he’s going to be fine.

Not only is AD ASTRA a compelling film but it also might be the best looking movie of the year. (And that’s not just because it stars hunky Brad Pitt.)

“What do you mean you dropped the wrench?”

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A Year In Space

Traveling to distant planets is not a quick journey so what happens to the human body during all that time in space? Glad you asked. In this ep, Bill and Chuck get down to the nitty gritty about long-term space travel.

Thanks to astronaut Scott Kelly (and his Earth-bound twin brother Mark) we’ve got some actual answers to the long-term effects of space travel.

Isn’t that the dude from Genesis?

And is it true that astronauts have to get real creative when it comes to recycling their fluids in space? If so…how creative…?

You do NOT want to know what’s in that vial

Chuck’s son Eddie wants to know how spacious our inter-planetary ships will be as we travel to Mars. Here’s a quick look inside the new Orion capsule where the astronauts will spend most of their time.

Will Eddie be able to chase his brother Oliver around the ship or will he have to torment him up close and personal?

A brief moment of calm before the Sibling Storm hits.

Hopefully Orion is bigger than those old Apollo capsules. Here’s Chuck (center) with his NASA buddy Rick (left) and writer pal Danny (right) stuffed into an Apollo mockup at Marshall Space Flight Center in AL a lifetime ago.

Not even the Saturn V could’ve lifted that much awesomeness into space

And while we’re talking about long-range space flight, any chance we can put some folks to sleep in suspended animation for all the months it’ll take to get to Mars? Hollywood does it all the time so it has to be possible, right?

Han Solo seemed to be OK once they thawed him out. What could go wrong?

If you have questions or comments about this episode, please feel free to respond in the comments section below, or CLICK HERE.

And while you’re thinking of us, how about leaving a review at your podcast provider of choice (iTunes, Stitcher, etc.)? We sure would appreciate it.

Say Hello to Planet Nine

Say Hello to Planet Nine

Say Hello to Planet Nine

In this episode, Bill and Chuck discuss the discovery of a brand new planet in the distant outskirts of our solar system. 

No, it’s not Pluto (don’t get us started on that topic!). Also, Chuck’s son Oliver has seen every Star Wars movie at least 20 times. He loves them all (yes, even Eps 1-3) but there’s one thing about those movies that really bugs him. He’ll ask Bill for an explanation.

Then we hear from a listener named Danny who’s curious about new methods of powering our space travels. Any chance we can speed up our future trips to other planets?

If you have a question or want to suggest a topic for our Rocket Scientist, send us a message and who knows, you could be a part of a future episode!

Space Tourism

Space Tourism

Space Tourism

What Does the Immediate Future Hold for Consumer Space Travel?

In this week’s episode, Bill and Chuck discuss the practicality of becoming a tourist in space. Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and a host of others want to get us there but will it really be worth it? We also celebrate the 50th anniversary of the movie 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY and chat about whether the science in the movie is grounded in reality or just a bunch of poppycock. Finally, a listener wants to know why we have yet to explore the moons of Jupiter and Saturn.

Feel free to leave a comment, suggest a topic or Ask A Rocket Scientist at our website iheartrocketscience.com